Kenyan official nudges UN to utilize African Diaspora

Nairobi- Kenya (PANA) -- Kenyan planning and national development minister Anyang Nyongo' has urged the United Nations to utilize African intellectuals and technocrats in the diaspora when addressing African issues, instead of "parachuting" so-called experts from New York, media reports said here Wednesday.
Nyongo' noted that in some cases the UN and other international organizations send the experts to Africa to seek information that is readily available on the Internet.
He made the remarks in a statement Monday at the UN Economic and Social Council forum ion New York convened to discuss the "funding of the UN development cooperation for the pursuit of the internationally agreed development goals".
The forum also discussed funding of goals contained in the millennium declarations and alternative options for funding the UN development activities.
Nyongo' said the Africans living abroad, if properly recruited, are "often more knowledgeable of the home environment and are more culturally sensitive to local issues".
"They (Diaspora intellectuals) may end up transferring their skills back to Africa on more permanent basis as the experience of India has shown," he said.
He said a reformed UN should be capable of delivering to member countries at the national level, and be "free of the heavyweight bureaucratic dinosaurs that revel at reproducing rules and regulations rather than generating innovative and development thinking".
Nyongo' proposed that UN service delivery agencies such as UNESCO, UNDP, UNICEF, WHO, HABITAT and UNEP, focus on service delivery at country level, building capacity at that level and using it adequately and effectively.
He said the "parachuting of experts" from UN headquarters was the technical assistance that leads to the waste of resources, while deepening underdevelopment in developing countries.
The minister challenged the UN to help galvanize intellectual capital in developing countries as part and parcel of capacity building.
He said the accumulation of intellectual capacity was often undermined by over-dependence on "parachuting experts" to developing countries.

13 Julho 2005 13:56:00




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